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Department of European Studies Division of German Studies

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Nurturing prospective graduates towards global communities, through the comprehensive study of the German-speaking world.

Since the reunification of East and West Germany in 1990, the country has been composed of the largest population and economic percentage in Europe.
Germany has been working on the balance between industrial growth and environmental protection from an early stage - which still remains a challenging global issue today. Indeed, Germany is now regarded as being in a leading position in these arenas, worldwide.

The Division of German Studies is one of the few institutions in Japan that offers programs in which students can systematically learn German, which is one of the major languages in Europe, as well as a diverse range of subjects concerning Germany.

Students can gain a high level of proficiency in German through a system of tutorials, with careful instruction provided by the tutors, which includes two Germans.
The programs are designed to offer a broad range of lectures and seminars on culture, economics, history, law, literature, philosophy, politics, drama and other subjects concerning the German-speaking world. These allow students to learn various aspects about the real Germany.
In addition, students will have the opportunity to also learn Scandinavian languages and cultures, which are closely related to German.

A number of the students in this Division, go to Germany to study at our partner university, the University of Cologne, or to participate in a language-study program at other universities in Germany, during the course - offering them the chance to further expand their horizons.

Degree Bachelor of Foreign Studies

Message from a Current Student

Department of European Studies Division of German Studies

Eri Sugiyama

Honestly, I was really worried about learning German because I had never studied the language until I entered the university. I had five German classes a week, including grammar, reading and conversation. However, thanks to the caring instructions of my teachers I was able to pass the third-level German proficiency test in the fall of my freshman year. At the University's festival, I was part of a group in the recitation tournament, where we recited German passages from memory. Every week, I go to my German instructor's lab to speak the language, although at this point I can speak only a little. Nevertheless, I'm enjoying a fulfilling university life. Currently, I'm studying toward my goal of passing a higher-level test in German proficiency. I recommend that people who plan to learn new foreign languages other than English, and people who are interested in other countries, expand their horizons by joyfully learning together with us in this major about the German language, culture and society.

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